Marjan Kozina Hall 

Slovenian Philharmonic

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Slovenian Philharmonic Choir

Slovenian Philharmonic String Quartet

Stojan Kuret, conductor

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Marij Kogoj

Stoji tam lipica (There Stands a Linden Tree, folksong arrangement)

Trpeča srca (Suffering Hearts, folksong arrangement)

Vrabci in strašilo (The Sparrows and the Scarecrow, Oton Župančič)

Barčica (Little Boat, Oton Župančič)

Seufzer (Jaroslav Vrchlicky)

Nageljni poljski (Carnations in the Field, Josip Murn)

Zvečer (The Evening, Janez Pucelj)

Ambrož Čopi:

Poljubil bi te ... (I would kiss you…, Srečko Kosovel) new work

Andrej Makor:

V vetru se ziblje (Swaying in the Wind, Srečko Kosovel)

Matej Kastelic:

O, saj ni smrti (O, There Is No Death, Srečko Kosovel)

Anej Černe:

Oblaki življenja (Clouds of Life, Srečko Kosovel)

Jernej Rustja:

Cesta samotnih (Road of the Lonely, Srečko Kosovel)

Patrick Quaggiato:

Psalm (Srečko Kosovel)

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Conductor Stojan Kuret graduated from the Ljubljana Academy of Music, majoring in conducting, and one year later completed his studies of the piano at the Conservatory of Music “Giuseppe Tartini” in Trieste. While still a student, he founded the Trieste Music Society Youth Choir, and in 1991 re-established the Jacobus Gallus Choir. In 1984, he received the Gallus Plaque for outstanding achievements in the field of choral music. From the 1992/93 season, he served ten years as the artistic director and conductor of the APZ Tone Tomšič Choir in Ljubljana. He is co-founder, artistic director and conductor of the Ljubljana Vocal Academy, which was established in September 2008. Kuret is the only conductor who has managed to win the European Grand Prix for Choral Singing twice. In 2012, he received the Prešeren Fund Prize for his activities in the field of choral music. He can be credited with introducing numerous works by Slovenian composers into the choral repertoire, including many new works. At the present concert, he will present musical settings of poetry by Slovenian poets, ranging from a “classic” composer (Kogoj), through established composers (Čopi, Quaggiato, Černe, Rustja), to younger composers (Makor, Kastelic).

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